Monthly Archives: November 2011

Lessons Learned from Two Girls in Pink Tutus


Back in September, a YouTube video featuring one eight-year-old diva and her shy, five-year-old lip-syncing cousin, uploaded a video of the two performing Nicki Minaj’s “Super Bass.” Within the month, this homemade video went viral and attracted more than 11 million views. This prompted Ellen Degeneres to invite the little girls onto her show to preform the song live. Little did they know that this was the start of something amazing.

Sophie Grace with Ellen Degeneres and Nikki Minaj

Sophia Grace and her cousin Rosie, both from Great Britain, sat down with Degeneres and made the audience go wild with their accents, maturity and pink tutus. After the interview, Degeneres handed the girls microphones and they performed the perfect a capella version of “Super Bass.” After the standing ovation they received from the crowd, Degeneres surprised the girls with a visit from Nicki Minaj. (If you have a few minutes, watch this video. You’ll be glad you did!)

On Tuesday, Degeneres invited the girls back on her show. During the interview Degeneres told Sophia that after she posted their video onto the Ellen Show’s YouTube channel, 23 million people viewed it over this past month. Degeneres then asked Sophia if she understood the number of views the video received, to which Sophia replied, “ it’s more than a thousand!” The girls went on to explain how they are now considered celebrities back home in England.

Why You Should Care About Videos

Even though the little girls can’t comprehend the impact their video has made, PR professionals certainly can. Now more than ever, companies are trying to create unique videos that will cut through all the clutter and stand out. According to a video from the Simply Zesty Simply Viral blog, a website that is correctly optimized with video increases the probability that it will appear on the first page of Google by 53 times. This video also claims that the effectiveness of an email marketing campaign will increase by more than 90 percent if it uses video.

The Cisco Visual Networking Index forecasts that in 2013, 90 percent of Internet traffic will be online video. PR companies should now, more than ever, be thinking of new ways to incorporate video into their strategies to enhance a clients’ reputation and brand image. To be most effective, the videos should give your audience the chance to interact and begin a relationship with the company. Then, direct your viewers to a social media platform, a blog or another website to further that relationship.

As for Sophia Grace and Rosie, their next adventure will be going to the American Music Awards and interviewing celebrities on the red carpet, all thanks to a little help from Ellen Degeneres and one very cute viral video that you won’t regret watching.

 

Pink: It’s not just a color; it’s an awareness tool

The month of October was quite eventful, if I do say so myself.  After a long await, Yuengling was finally released for sale in Ohio, 56 exotic animals were let loose from a farm in Zanesville and Kim Kardashian ended her 72-day marriage to Kris Humphries—I’m worn out just thinking about all that hoopla. Despite all the craziness happening around the States—more so Ohio—National Breast Cancer Awareness Month still received its own time in the spotlight.

According to breastcancer.org, one in eight women in the U.S. will develop Breast Cancer during her life. We have seen Breast Cancer awareness initiatives take place on the national level as well as in our local communities. Pink has practically become the new black for the month of October, and every year, there seems to be more and more awareness created for those affected by Breast Cancer.

Why, you may ask? Breast Cancer gets support—big support! Here’s what I like to call the triple threat of Breast Cancer awareness:  personality, visuals and connections.

Save the Ta-tas ShirtSave the Ta-Tas®: Personality Development

Nothing says breasts like Ta-Tas®. A fairly new initiative, Save the Ta-Tas® puts a spin on the serious subject of Breast Cancer with a catchy name to raise funds for Breast Cancer research. This organization isn’t bashful about calling out the white elephant in the room—cancer—and looks at different ways to beat it in exciting, engaging ways through events and funny apparel. It allows audiences to associate Save the Ta-Tas® positivity and optimism with Breast Cancer. Because of its branding standpoint, Save the Ta-Tas® has created an identity and personality for itself which individuals will come to know, love and support for years to come.

NFL: Visual Impact

A Crucial Catch caught the attention of sports fans once again with an explosion of pink on the football field. The National Football League teamed up with the American Cancer Society to acknowledge National Breast Cancer Awareness Month by wearing pink cleats, pink gloves, pink hats, on-field pink ribbon stencils— basically, you name it, they have it.  All pink gear, game balls and coins are auctioned off at the NFL Auction which gives earnings to the American Cancer Society as well as team charities. Call me crazy, but combining big, strong men with more pink than Barbie® to support a huge initiative is genius. These elements create a visual impact of Breast Cancer Awareness that has caused a trickle-down effect into college and even high school sports. I’m no Vince Lombardi, but that’s what I like to dub a good play call.

Susan G. Komen: Personal Connection

Susan G. Koman Race for the CureFinally. The big kahuna for Breast Cancer awareness: Susan G. Komen.  The brains behind this operation are astounding. Not only does it give women tools to maintain a healthy lifestyle and outlets to prevent Breast Cancer, Susan G. Komen’s Race for the Cure® serves as a way to connect cancer patients and survivors with their family and friends. This organization personalizes the experience by allowing others to walk for their moms, grandmas, sisters, aunts, etc. who have been affected. Susan G. Komen provides an outlet for women, friends and families of cancer patients, victims and survivors to learn and do something proactive that represents a huge issue.

No matter what issue, organization or product you may be raising awareness about, maintaining those three key “threats” will get your message noticed, even if exotic monkeys, tigers and bears are freely roaming in your backyard.