Monthly Archives: June 2014

Digital Nomads – A new approach to mobile marketing strategy

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It’s no secret that mobile is the future of marketing. So I won’t restate that truth. However, I will beg you not to underestimate the statement. It’s easy to do. Marketing is all about connecting an audience with products and services. We do this by knowing and understanding the audience.

That audience is changing. All of it. Not just 18 to 25 year olds or affluent professionals. All of it. We are now perpetually in motion and it’s all thanks to our phones.

We aren’t embracing mobile

The concept of mobile is unnatural to us. Thousands of years ago, people learned life was easier if they stayed in one place, harvested crops and domesticated livestock. Since then, we’ve evolved the concept to the point of infallibility. We’ve swapped trade for a monetary system, commercialized food production and engineered endless technological advances to make stationary life simpler. The idea is so baked into our ethos that it’s become a core tenant of marketing: place. The physical location of a good or service.

But we made one mistake. We got too good at developing and refining agricultural, industrialized society. You can get in your car and drive as far as you’d like in any direction. As long as you have a wallet and credit card, you’ll find food and shelter. Add a smartphone, and suddenly you have a traveling stationary life – a new form of nomadic living.

Overcoming instinct

People aren’t just looking for your product or service from their computer chair in a home office. This is no surprise. But look a step further and you can see nomadic living in everything about how audiences interact with your product or service. Are your mobile users at work, on the couch watching TV, sitting in traffic or in a hotel room? What do they want to know in those times and places?

We’ve heard marketing teams talk about responsive redesigns as failures because mobile bounce rates don’t change. But mobile users are often only looking for a name or address. They will go to a page, get the info they need, leave the site and register as a bounce.

Sometimes marketers miss opportunities in lead generation because a site doesn’t cater to customers on the move. This can mean a lot of things. Maybe you’re asking for information that’s too cumbersome on a mobile device. Even if you think your mobile strategy is buttoned up, consider this scenario. True was recently at SMX Advanced (a search marketing conference for SEOs and search engine advertisers) where Matt Cutts, the head of Google’s Webspam team and overall Google guru, asked a room full of top digital marketers if they felt they had outstanding mobile strategies. Every hand in the room shot up. Then he asked if their lead-gen forms were coded to autofill on mobile devices. The majority of hands slowly receded and everyone looked kind of embarrassed.

Now what?

This post isn’t a roadmap to a better mobile strategy. It isn’t even a lesson in mobile marketing. It’s a strong recommendation to re-evaluate your audience and learn how and why they move. Because they are going somewhere. If you can’t help them get there faster, then someone else will.

Author: Tyler Norris [Google+]

Our New Favorite Pinterest Tool

When Pinterest introduced analytics for business accounts in early 2013, marketers could finally gain some insight into what works and what doesn’t work for their brand. Pinterest’s built-in analytics show what’s popular (most pinned and most clicked), what’s been pinned from your website and documents impressions, reach, clicks and visits for a specified date range.

But what if you want to go beyond metrics for individual pins? How do you know what boards are working well, which ones have the highest potential to go viral, and where to focus your efforts for maximum visibility? That’s where Tailwind comes in. We’ve been using the free version for the past few months and we’re impressed.

The profile view gives you a quick snapshot of the basic stats (followers, pins, repins and likes), but then goes a step further to translate those stats into engagement indicators that  tell you how your entire account is performing.Screen Shot 2014-06-05 at 3.22.22 PM

 

From there, Tailwind digs into each individual board in an account and provides a snapshot of activity (pins, followers and repins) plus the same engagement indicators. Using this information, marketers can begin to zero in on boards and topics with high engagement and use that information to further drive Pinterest strategy.

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How about you? What are your favorite Pinterest tools or tricks?