Monthly Archives: July 2014

The Marketer’s Guide to Facebook Graph Search

 

The audience data on Facebook is a marketer’s dream.  And if you aren’t using Facebook’s free tools to mine it, you’re missing out on valuable insights about your customers.

Graph Search queries aren’t new to Facebook (they launched in 2013 with updated profiles), but so few people seem to use the feature. Its primary purpose is to make Facebook more like Google – answering useful questions for Facebook users to add value to the service. For example, typing “Restaurants my friends like near Cleveland”) in the blue header bar returns a Yelp-like map of restaurants and reviews. But the information you can query about pages, people who like pages and their interest are endless. What can you find out? Glad you asked. See the full list of Graph Search queries for marketers below.

There are a lot of things this info can do for you, including:

  • Guide your content strategy
  • Offer promotion and contest ideas
  • Reveal ad targeting opportunities
  • Show social media best practices for similar audiences

Don’t let the long list of queries scare you. You won’t need all of them. We just had trouble finding a comprehensive list for marketers, so we made one of our own! If you just want to learn a little more about your audience, try starting with the following process.

  1. “Interests of people who like [my page]” – Dip your toe in the water and learn a little bit about your audience’s interests.
  2. “Pages liked by people who like [my page]” – Similar to interests, this will tell you what your audience does on social media. Look for your competition on this list to determine if there’s a strong overlap.
  3. “Pages liked by people who are interested in [interests revealed by previous searches]” – See what pages with people with those interests like. What kind of content do those pages post? What kind of tone do they use?
  4. “Groups of people who like [pages identified in step 3]” – Looking at the groups those users belong to will give you an idea of the types of conversions and topics the audience finds interesting. It can help you determine the types of content you should produce or help you find influencers.
  5. Repeat all the above steps for your competition. Depending on the overlap in likes, you may get dramatically different results.

 

 

Discover What People Like

Find out what people like:

  • Favorite interests of [person]
  • Favorite interests of people who like [place]
  • Favorite interests of people who live in [place]
  • Favorite interests of people who like [page] and live nearby
  • Favorite interests of people who like [page] and live in [place]
  • Favorite interests of people who like [page] and work at [company]

 

Behavioral factors

  • [organization, media, place, page, person] liked by people who like [page]
  • [organization, media, place, page, person] liked by people who live in [place]
  • [organization, media, place, page, person] liked by people who work at [company]
  • [organization, media, place, page, person] liked by people who live in [place] and like [page]

 

Similar/Popular Page Identification

  • Pages liked by people who like [page]
  • Pages liked by people who live in [page]
  • Pages liked by people who like [page] and work at [company]
  • Pages liked by people who like [page] and live in [place]
  • Pages liked by people who like [page] and visited [place or location page]
  • Pages liked by people who like [page] and visited [place or location page]
  • Pages liked by people who live in [place] and work at [company]
  • Pages liked by people who live in [place] and visited [place or location page]
  • Pages liked by people who live in [place] and visited [place]
  • Pages liked by people who live in [place] and like [page]

 

Find people

Find people by where they work:

  • People who work at [company] and like [page]
  • People who work at [company] and live in [place]
  • People who work at [company] and visited [place or location page]

 

Find people by pages they like:

  • People who like [page] and [page]
  • People who like [page] and [place]
  • People who like [page] and visited [place or location page]

 

Find a new group:

  • Groups of people who like [page]
  • Groups of people who like [page] and [page]
  • Groups of people who like [page] and visited [place or location page]

 

 

Find places

Find Businesses/Services

  • Places that people who like [page] visited
  • Places that people who live in [place] visited
  • Places that people who work at [company] visited
  • Places that people who work at [company] and like [page] visited
  • Places that people who work at [company] and live in [place] visited

 

 

Author: Tyler Norris [Google+]

 

Are we “too connected”?

IMG_8534Over the past six months, I’ve noticed an overwhelming (and somewhat shocking) trend at almost every in-person meeting I attend. Before I tell you what it is, I bet you either have one right beside you, or you may be reading this blog post from one. That’s right – I’m talking about cell phones – those wonderful little devices that allow us to hold the whole world on our fingertips. Now, I’m not saying that I’m not guilty of having my iPhone by me at meetings from time to time, but now that I’m tuned into the fact that many of us feel we “need” to have our devices inches from our reach, I’ve been consciously putting my phone away. This rant isn’t to scold anyone who may keep their phone next to them, but I’m hoping this may serve as a gentle reminder that it’s OK to put your phone away. I promise you that the withdrawal from your device won’t kill you. Sure, you may get the shakes or feel anxious about missing the next great selfie your friends post to Facebook- but I can guarantee you (and most importantly) your co-workers and client will secretly be happy that you were fully engaged in the conversation.

Are we capable of multitasking? 

Multitasking is a skill that many people think they are good at. But can the human brain truly process multiple things at the same time and process them well? Ira Hyman, a Western Washington University cognitive psychologist and professor believes multitasking comes at a significant cost.  “Whenever people are in a situation when they’re both trying to track a social interaction they’re engaged in and track something with their cell phones, they’re engaged in a divided-attention task,” Hyman says. “What this means is that they’ll do both things more poorly than if they did one of them.”

Meeting Etiquette

I guess the point I’m trying to get to is that having your phone out at a meeting just seems rude. So please, the next time you’re in a face-to-face meeting, make it just that. Face-to-screen just isn’t the same.

Author: Allison Ewing[Google+]

Time for a Facebook Break?

facebookbreak 2Every generation has its breaks. For my grandfather it was a lunch break. For my parents it was a coffee break or a smoke break. So what breaks do we take today? Increasingly we check our favorite social media channels to see what’s going on.

True Digital Media Strategist Shannon Wallace pointed out a new social media trend. With so many people using mobile devices to access social media, it’s common to take a quick break during the workday to check Facebook, Twitter or Instagram to see what’s going on. Shannon refers to it as a Facebook Break. It’s the Millennial’s and Generation X’s version of a coffee or smoke break, which they might be doing too since they multitask constantly.

When you’re developing a social media strategy, remember to think about how your target audience consumes social media. They’re probably not Facebooking for hours but instead are checking in for five to 10 minutes. You need to grab their attention and not ask them to do too much. They don’t have time. Remember, no one likes to work when they’re taking a break.