A Brief (visual) Guide to Facebook Insights

A lot of marketers disagree on which Facebook Insights are important.  But isn’t it important to understand what the numbers mean before deciding how to evaluate a campaign? Different campaigns require different metrics. Even an extremely broad metric like impressions can have relevance for paid ad campaigns.

 

The infographic below shows the relationship between each of the social network’s primary metrics. Each one can be broken down further into organic, viral and paid. They can also be sliced by day, week and month (most recent 28 days).This  infographic also shows how each smaller metric is a part of a larger one. Since every Facebook page is different, it’s impossible to make a perfect scale model. Instead, circles sizes show a general relationship in number recorded by each metric for the average page.

*To see the infographic in its entirety, click on the image.

Facebook Insights infographic

 

 

The super-secret, guaranteed effective guide to building engagement in social media


It’s unfortunate, really. I didn’t even want to write this post. But after endless conversations about the secret to building engagement, I realized it needed to be said.  So here it is. Are you ready? Read carefully, the super-secret, guaranteed effective guide to building engagement in social media:

The super-secret, guaranteed effective guide to building engagement in social media.

  1. Provide value to your audience

 

Oh, I’m sorry. Were you waiting for more? That’s it. That’s all you have to do. A lot of marketers will talk to you about social media engagement strategy like it’s a secret recipe for Sunday sauce handed down from their great grandmother. They’ll say you need one part education, two parts consumer spotlight, a dash of sales-oriented content and with a little love you suddenly have three-million comments, Likes and retweets.

Sure, there may be a certain mix of content that works for your brand, but only because you’re selling a particular product to a particular audience with a particular interest. That’s what they like.

You might think this is a bland recipe, but let it simmer. Think about it. There are two operative words: value and audience.

 

Audience

The folks in your online community are already customers, right? So you should know who they are and what they want (If you don’t know them, you have bigger problems than social media). Now, all you have to do is talk to them. Post things they want to see. If you were talking face-to-face with a customer, how would they respond to your latest update? Would they say “Wow, neat!” or would it be more like “Oh, I see.” Users were gracious enough to click that Like or follow button. Now give them something in return.

All too often, management wants to highlight moments that make management proud and make the organization look good. That’s fine – if you can honestly say your audience would find it valuable. Photos from your company picnic probably won’t do the trick.

The people in your online community are there because you share some common value.  Don’t ruin that relationship by telling them to think, feel or believe something different.

 

Value

Value isn’t just education. It can come in a lot of forms and it’s completely dependent on your audience. For example, there is a little newspaper is my hometown (I’m convinced their number of Facebook Likes is higher than their circulation). Every day, they post a poll question. Polls vary from local to state to national issues. You can always count on huge numbers of people posting paragraph-long responses. So how is this tiny daily providing value? It gives local politiphiles a place to voice their opinions. If you’ve gone to the trouble of Liking your local newspaper on Facebook, it’s safe to say you like to discuss current events. And hey, why not do it with a bunch of strangers on Facebook where you’re less likely to offend any friends or coworkers.

 

Skittles is another great example of providing value to your audience. With all current events aside, Skittles knows its audience on social media. I chuckle every time I read an update from skittles. See the below image if you need an example. You might say humor isn’t valuable from a marketing standpoint. But at the end of the day, what is Skittles as a brand?  Sure it’s food. But it’s not healthy. It’s not innovative. It’s fun – just plain old fun. Skittles are bright, colorful and easy to share with friends, just like their musings on Facebook.

So, next time you write a Tweet or click the “post” button, just ask yourself: Am I providing value to my audience? If the answer is yes, engagement shouldn’t be a problem.

 

3 Reasons why Pinning is #Winning

“Pin it” seems to be the catchphrase of the social media world as a result from the latest online craze, aka Pinterest. And, guess what? The picture/video-sharing site is sticking with users just as well as Ellen’s singing sensations Sophia Grace and Rosie (you have to check out their latest performance).

Pinterest Logo

Pinterest logo, courtesy of Google Images.

There are tons of articles floating around the cyber world that break down all you ever wanted to know about Pinterest, but we’ve boiled it down to the top three reasons why “Pinning is Winning.”

  1. Sight: There is a reason why people say “A picture is worth a thousand words.” And when it comes to Pinterest, that is a lot of words. The pictures on Pinterest are appealing and serve as a form of expression that can be interpreted in different ways and can represent various things we see on a day-to-day basis. Look at it this way: are you more willing to try a new recipe if you read about it or if you see a picture of it?
  2. Categories: It does not take long to notice the countless types of boards and categories Pinterest covers. I mean, the name Pinterest speaks for itself—the root word being interest if you have not caught on by now. From recipes to technology, Pinterest allows users to focus on their own interests, explore and share with others. It has become the go-to hub for sharing ideas, and it serves as a brands’ Mecca for monitoring and keying in on audiences’ interests. Who would have thought, right?
  3. Links: Pinterest gives credit where credit is due. Instead of seeing a picture or video and scrambling through webpage after webpage to find it, Pinterest serves as your personal tour guide and takes you to the exact page it came from. This is where the whole “what’s in it for me” comes into play. It is a great way for companies to direct new visitors or loyal consumers directly to its website or blog because they are clearly looking for something. Linking individuals back to a brand’s website is also an excellent way to create engagement and give users a reason to return.

Bottom line: Do not doubt the power of Pinterest. It has taken the world by storm and is raising the bar every day of how we share and explore online. I will just let this infographic speak for itself. http://mashable.com/2012/02/25/pinterest-user-demographics/

 

What’s Your Social Capital?

Repmanagment management in social mediaFrom Facebook statuses to hash tags to Pinterest boards, we have become consumed with posting every event that happens in our lives onto social media outlets. But could there be consequences for sharing too much information?

It may happen sooner than you think.

According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, the age of online reputation is upon us. Several companies, including Twitalyzer, PeerIndex and PostRank, are already applying online analytics on individuals and businesses, quantifying “social capital.” (AKA- Online Influence)

The New Credit Score
Similar to a credit score, showing the creditworthiness a person possesses, a new numerical score may be affecting your reputation: your online reputation.

This new score will more than likely be used to make decisions relating to jobs, internships and even loans. But thanks to reputation.com, the first-ever online reputation management company, monitoring what people say about you online is easier than ever. So whether you’re a college student or the CEO of a company, this service will alert you when there are damaging posts about you and can even delete unwanted negative mentions for a fee.

Resumes No More
The idea of online reputation management could come into play very soon, since companies are now relying on job candidates’ social media sites to gauge their suitability for a particular position. Jobs that once required a resume, may now ask for a snapshot of your Twitter feed, Facebook, personal blog and LinkedIn profile.

With online reputation management on the horizon, it’s important to understand what social circle you may or may not want to be associated with. As this new trend makes its way into the spotlight, it’s also critical to know how to present yourself in a respectable way online while still allowing your personality to show through. Yes, it’s the “digital age,” but there’s eventually a line you cannot cross when it comes to content.; especially if it could cost you your next job.

So the next time you tweet, post or pin your life on the World Wide Web, think of the consequences it could have on your future, or invest in a membership to reputation.com!

 

Lessons Learned from Two Girls in Pink Tutus


Back in September, a YouTube video featuring one eight-year-old diva and her shy, five-year-old lip-syncing cousin, uploaded a video of the two performing Nicki Minaj’s “Super Bass.” Within the month, this homemade video went viral and attracted more than 11 million views. This prompted Ellen Degeneres to invite the little girls onto her show to preform the song live. Little did they know that this was the start of something amazing.

Sophie Grace with Ellen Degeneres and Nikki Minaj

Sophia Grace and her cousin Rosie, both from Great Britain, sat down with Degeneres and made the audience go wild with their accents, maturity and pink tutus. After the interview, Degeneres handed the girls microphones and they performed the perfect a capella version of “Super Bass.” After the standing ovation they received from the crowd, Degeneres surprised the girls with a visit from Nicki Minaj. (If you have a few minutes, watch this video. You’ll be glad you did!)

On Tuesday, Degeneres invited the girls back on her show. During the interview Degeneres told Sophia that after she posted their video onto the Ellen Show’s YouTube channel, 23 million people viewed it over this past month. Degeneres then asked Sophia if she understood the number of views the video received, to which Sophia replied, “ it’s more than a thousand!” The girls went on to explain how they are now considered celebrities back home in England.

Why You Should Care About Videos

Even though the little girls can’t comprehend the impact their video has made, PR professionals certainly can. Now more than ever, companies are trying to create unique videos that will cut through all the clutter and stand out. According to a video from the Simply Zesty Simply Viral blog, a website that is correctly optimized with video increases the probability that it will appear on the first page of Google by 53 times. This video also claims that the effectiveness of an email marketing campaign will increase by more than 90 percent if it uses video.

The Cisco Visual Networking Index forecasts that in 2013, 90 percent of Internet traffic will be online video. PR companies should now, more than ever, be thinking of new ways to incorporate video into their strategies to enhance a clients’ reputation and brand image. To be most effective, the videos should give your audience the chance to interact and begin a relationship with the company. Then, direct your viewers to a social media platform, a blog or another website to further that relationship.

As for Sophia Grace and Rosie, their next adventure will be going to the American Music Awards and interviewing celebrities on the red carpet, all thanks to a little help from Ellen Degeneres and one very cute viral video that you won’t regret watching.

 

True communications

Many people now have an aversion to traditional advertising

It started with an idea that scared the hell out of me.  What if PR and advertising as we’ve all known it to be didn’t work anymore? What if the media didn’t carry the same influence as it always had or if people simply stopped watching television? At the time, these
were radical thoughts, but now they aren’t so far-fetched and people are actually beginning to watch less television.

True Digital Communications was formed on the belief that digital communications is built on a foundation of open, honest and relevant conversation. Gone are the days of simply interrupting with advertising or building brands with crafty, expensive public relations campaigns. Simply by performing a search, key audiences can learn everything they need to know about a brand including its products, personality, customer interactions, employee morale, history, reviews, etc. This is what I call a brand’s Digital DNA – the brand with all of its beauty and warts is on full display, every minute of every day. There is no place to hide it. So why not embrace your organization’s Digital DNA and build a proactive communications program around it?  Sounds like a bold idea but to the digital marketer, this is the opportunity.

I created True to help brands find and develop their voice through search marketing, digital public relations, email marketing, mobile and analytics. True, honest and effective communications is not just from the brand, but from all of its constituents, too. Working together, the effects on brand awareness, loyalty, customer service and thought leadership is exponentially more powerful than anything implemented through traditional means.

New thinking and new processes are done through a new type of marketing professional.  They love communications but understand the power of spreadsheets and analytics to understand what’s working and why. They are trailblazers who respect traditional means but embrace technology and new thinking to create better, more effective ideas and processes.

Team True is made up of professionals who vary in age and experience, but who are the best-in-class at what they do. Working together, we bring down the wall between traditional marketing silos and embrace new technologies and new thinking to create a brand voice in the digital space.

We welcome your thoughts and reactions to our ideas. The potential for an organization that embraces true communications – pure, relevant, naked, honest – is enormous.

It’s time for True communications.